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Drosselmeyer
Drosselmeyer

"All children who love stories, come gather 'round."
Name Drosselmeyer
Kanji ドロッセルマイヤー
Rōmaji Dorosserumaiyā
Characteristics
Age Unknown
Gender Male
Eyes Orange
Hair White
Professional Status
Occupation Storyteller
Personal Status
Status Deceased
Relatives Fakir (descendant)
First Appearance
Anime Debut The Duck and the Prince
Voices
Japanese Voice Noboru Mitani

Drosselmeyer is an elderly man with a long, white beard, and though he is long dead, he made his last story where he could continue it during his death. Drosselmeyer is the main antagonist of the anime.

Years before the opening of the series, Drosselmeyer was a writer that was working on his masterpiece, The Prince and the Raven. However, before he could complete his story, he died, leaving his story unfinished and the two title characters trapped in an endless battle. Eventually, the characters were able to leave the story—and it turned out that Drosselmeyer, while dead, could somehow control the story even from his grave...

In the series, Drosselmeyer takes a mostly passive role (or at least seems to be), commenting on the action and giving Duck, and occasionally other characters, little pushes in the directions he'd like to see the story go. At first, he appears to be mostly on Duck's side, trying to encourage her to continue in her task to recover Mytho's lost heart, even when things become difficult for her. But he has a sadistic streak that's obvious from the start, and it soon becomes clear that the sort of story Drosselmeyer finds entertaining likely won't be as happy as the characters might want.

Thanks to being a writer and storyteller in the series, Drosselmeyer is often very genre savvy, particularly when it comes to fairytales. He takes great delight in telling the other characters what they should be doing per their "roles" in the story, and will sometimes even scold the characters for subverting their roles and trying to do something beyond what's expected for them. However, even when things seem to be going against what he'd wanted, after a brief moment of frustration he chippers back up as long as the twist is at least entertaining.

This is, perhaps, the part of Drosselmeyer that is most chilling—although his "characters" are real people trapped in a story, he's fine with anything happening to them—as long as the story is entertaining. While this is a perfectly reasonable reaction towards fictional characters, the sociopathic personality needed to treat real people this way along with the near-godlike power to actually make it happen makes for a quite frightening combination of person, indeed.

TriviaEdit

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